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Livens & Reed, PLLC

Posts tagged "Estate Administration"

Is medical debt a priority during probate?

When a person dies, the surviving family often has a lot to handle in order to close the remaining estate. Often, the majority of tasks associated with probate fall to the executor of a Texas estate. Though many bills may need paying after a loved one's passing, some parties may wonder specifically about medical bills.

Stepparent handling estate administration may concern children

When a loved one does not make end-of-life preparations, it is easy for issues to come about among the surviving family. Some family members may realize that there is a chance for problems before their loved one's passing, but due to mental decline or other issues, the person is unable to create an estate plan. As a result, Texas families may be left to find the best way to handle estate administration and any resulting conflict.

Ensuring an estate plan fully meets the creator's needs

It is usual for people in Texas to plan for the future. Often, these plans consider important financial considerations that are part of an estate plan. While there are a variety of different options and tools available to those completing such planning, there are ways for people to create a plan that is enforceable and fully represents their wishes and goals.

Choosing the most appropriate trustee for an estate

There are a variety of different decisions that go into the process of how assets will be divided. Many of these include how assets will be divided and how they will be treated. Perhaps one of the most important decisions that must be made involves who will be managing a Texas estate in addition to how it will be divided. 

Does a childless couple need a will?

Many people in Texas have a certain idea of what a family looks like. However, the reality is that families come in all shapes and sizes. For example, many couples, for a variety of different reasons, do not have children. Because there is a misconception that a will is only necessary to ensure that children are provided for in the event their parents are no longer able to provide such care, many childless couples may not fully understand the implications of a lack of an estate plan.

Absence of a will can create family conflict

No family is perfect. While all have their disagreements, there are some siblings who simply cannot get along. Unfortunately, this contention can continue -- perhaps even intensify -- after a parent passes away. However, having a will in place in Texas -- and giving the appropriate people access to it -- can often help reduce confusion and arguments between siblings following the death of a parent.

Who pays the debts of an estate when a loved one dies?

These days, few people across the country pass away without leaving debts behind. The creditors owed those debts will attempt to collect them regardless of the passing of a loved one. The question many Texas residents may have is who is responsible for the amounts owed -- the estate or family members.

The executor can prepare for probate before the loved one passes

Closing a Texas estate can come with many complications. The executor of the estate will have a number of responsibilities to handle during this time, and without the right information, this person could face more difficulties in an already trying process. Fortunately, if an individual knows that he or she will take on this role, preparing before the loved one's passing may be useful.

An estate full of clutter may require careful cleaning

Perhaps one of the most emotional and tedious jobs a Texas family has is cleaning out a home after a loved one dies. This may be especially true if the loved one was sentimental and held on to countless trinkets and other memorabilia. While it may be tempting to bag it all up and toss it on the curb for trash or recycling, handling the situation in this manner may create serious problems, especially for the estate executor or personal representative.

Americans procrastinate about wills, estate plans and money

Preparing and maintaining an updated will is one of the best things a person can do for his or her family. People who have assets and want to have them distributed in a specific manner after their death will need to layout their requests in a will. In Texas and elsewhere, over 30 percent of adults procrastinate about creating a will or any sort of estate plan.

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